The official swearing in–December 3rd! Come out and celebrate our collaborative victory!

The official swearing in–December 3rd! Come out and celebrate our collaborative victory!

Amigos: come out on December 3rd and celebrate the formal Commishinization! My dear friend & civil rights champion Rep. Angela Bryant will administer the oath!
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The Orange County Board of Commissioners cordially invites you to attend an in-house reception to recognize our three in-coming Commissioners: Mark Dorosin, Renee Price, and Penny Rich on Monday, December 3rd
from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. at the Central Orange Senior Center,
103 Meadowlands Drive (Adjacent to the Triangle Sportsplex), in Hillsborough, N.C.

120 hours to go!

120 hours to go!

In 120 hours, we will know whether I’ll will be joining the Board of Orange County Commissioners. There is still time to vote early tomorrow and Saturday morning, and of course election day on Tuesday. Please join us to celebrate the results on Tuesday night at the Orange County Social Club, as soon as the polls close at 7:30pm.

Thank you for all the support and good wishes over the past few months!

Some testimonials

Some testimonials

Thanks to Minister of Motion Picture Science Jesse Paddock for putting this together, and to Jennifer Marsh, Cameron Ellis, Jeremy Collins, Jonathan Weiler and of course, Minister of Art Ron Liberti for all their hard work and support.

Thank you, Indy!

Thank you, Indy!

We are so grateful to The Independent Weekly for their resounding endorsement of Mark!

The relevant part is below, you can read the whole article online.

Indy VOTEIt’s time for a sea change at the Orange Board of County Commissioners and we can’t think of two better candidates to do the paddling for District 1 than Mark Dorosin and Penny Rich.

Both candidates are keying on transit, economic development and trash as the most important issues facing the county.

Each has experience serving on town government, something that is lacking on the current board. Dorosin served on the Carrboro Board of Aldermen from 1999–2003. Rich is a Chapel Hill Town Council member.

With Orange County’s trash plans still in limbo even as the Rogers Road landfill is set to close in June 2013, now is the time to elect leaders who have the vision for how to responsibly dispose of the waste.

If we invented our ideal candidate for this office, his or her résumé would look similar to Dorosin’s. He’s the managing attorney at the UNC Center for Civil Rights, where he works alongside Julius Chambers. Dorosin was instrumental in the successful campaign to rescind the anti-lingering ordinance in Carrboro that prevented day laborers from congregating on a public street corner during midday hours. He knows the issues facing small local businesses. He owned Hell, a favorite Rosemary Street watering hole, for a decade. He also worked as a loan officer at Self-Help Credit Union.

Like the other candidates, he opposes Amendment 1, but he takes it a step further by stating that if the referendum passes, he would instruct the county to continue offering benefits to same-sex couples and those in civil unions until the federal government says otherwise.

Independent Weekly Questionnaire

Independent Weekly Questionnaire

Tomorrow The Independent Weekly will release their coveted candidate endorsements, so I thought we should go ahead and post Mark’s responses to their questionnaire better late than never. He actually submitted this two weeks ago, and I had planned to post it here much sooner.

As you can see the questions are challenging, and Mark’s answers are thorough. The Indy also bases their endorsements on interviews with community leaders and journalists. I hope they will agree with me that Mark will bring some sorely needed progressive leadership to the Board of Orange County Commissioners.



1. What are the three most important issues facing Orange County? If elected, what are your top three priorities in addressing those issues?

  1. Fulfilling our obligations to the Rogers Road community: Whatever decisions are ultimately made about solid waste disposal, the discussion must begin from the position that 1) there will be no further solid waste impacts on the Rogers Road community, and 2) we will finally provide the community with the long overdue compensations it is owed for the decades of bearing the substantial burdens of the county’s solid waste operations, including complete water and sewer connections to homes and comprehensive cleanup of illegal dumpsites. We also must quickly re-start the process, in collaboration with the towns, to develop a local waste disposal plan.
  1. Maintaining and enhancing our socio-economic, racial and ethnic diversity:  aggressively recruit and nurture economic development that meets social justice and environmental values as well as enhances non-residential tax base; increase support and incentives  that promote housing affordability and diversity and preserves existing and vulnerable communities; increase outreach to, participation by and government responsiveness to needs of underserved demographics, including low-wealth neighborhoods, communities of color, students, and rural areas.
  1. Developing a coordinated strategy and providing active leadership on critical emerging issues: the commissioners must adopt policies that highlight the interconnected nature of key issues and recognize that decisions regarding one directly implicate others.  The three biggest issues facing the county–transit, economic development, and solid waste– require smart, intentional strategies that will work synergistically to ensure that all communities benefit from the decisions that shape the county’s future.  That will require better coordination and leadership both within the county government itself, as well as with other governments in and around the county.

Read the rest of this entry

Campaigning heats up as we get down to the wire!

Campaigning heats up as we get down to the wire!

With Election Day only 3 1/2 weeks away and early voting starting all over the county on April 23 (at the Board of Elcetions on the 19th), our campaign is moving into high gear.  This week there was a candidates forum on Wednesday (read the WCHL coverage here http://www.chapelboro.com/BoCC-Candidates-Debate-Town-and-County-Sprawl/12811368 and the DTH story here http://www.dailytarheel.com/index.php/blog/town_talk/2012/04/4f8639264e3c6), and today I talked at length with the News of Orange and the Chapel  Hill-Carrboro Chamber of Commerce.

Tomorrow I’ll be at the Orange County Democratic Party convention, and on Sunday at two house parties being held by dedicated Operation Commish supporters Catherine Devine, and Jen Bills and Barb Fedders.  Sunday evening is the online candidate forum hosted by Orange Politics. I’ll be steaming and streaming! 

Also this weekend we’ll be out going door-to-door in neigborhoods across District 1, talking about the core principles of our campaign: social justice, communtiy engagement, and prosperity.  We’ll also be reminding folks to vote against Amendment 1, and of course, our vision of a fair county and a county fair.  If you’re interested in getting out in the sunshine on Sunday afternoon and talking to folks about the campaign, please let me know.

We also have great, collectible Ron Liberit designed “fair county/county fair” t-shirts.  They’re available with a donation of $25 or more.

Esme' says, "You know you want one."

A fair county and a county fair

A fair county and a county fair

A major theme of my campaign is to ensure that our fundamental values of social justice, equity, and community engagement are the primary considerations in all county decision making.  A key component to achieving this vision requires all of us –elected officials in each local government and residents throughout Orange County– to work together to achieve our collective potential.  We need to put aside the differences we too often let divide us, and celebrate the diversity that make our community so unique.  What better way to embrace the agriculture, artisans, craftspeople, musicians, and creativity in Orange County, bring the whole community together, and create an annual economic boost than a county fair?  

That’s what I’d like to see: a fair county and a county fair.